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Spring Blooms Report

Plants bloom throughout the spring season. These weekly reports will help visitors identify what’s currently in bloom and where the plants can be found at the Conservatory or in Franklin Park.

Reports are typically published on Thursdays and can also be found through the weekly newsletter and on the Conservatory’s social media channels.

The final report of the season will be published on May 12; we hope your enjoyed watching spring unfold with us. If you have any feedback, please email marketing@fpconservatory.org. Stay tuned for a Fall Foliage Report!

May 12 Report This is not the last week of spring, though this is the final Spring Blooms Report. Here at Franklin Park Conservatory & Botanical Gardens, we are prepping seasonal garden spaces for our summer display. We are keeping an eye on the weather and soil temperatures, the plan is that the summer garden displays will start to be installed next week. A garden in bloom is a wonderful thing.

When you visit, look for:

  • Umbrella magnolias and their lovely, plate-sized cream flowers.

  • Viburnums with white snowball flowers and flat umbel flowers in the Scotts Miracle-Gro Foundation Children’s Garden and Scotts Miracle-Gro Company Community Garden Campus.

  • Irises in the Grand Mallway’s pergola beds.

  • Blue wood hyacinths along the southern path in the Children’s Garden.

  • Fragrant or hardy abelias in the Word Garden in the Children’s Garden.

  • The white flowers under the umbrella-like leaves of native mayapples. 

  • Striped maples by the Children’s Garden creek and on the Botanical Gardens Welcome Patio. They have green, bell-shaped flowers that dangle like tassels.

  • Ohio Buckeyes and Red Buckeyes with showy upright panicles. The Ohio buckeye is near the entrance to the Children’s Garden and the Red buckeyes are near the barn in the Community Garden Campus.

  • Columbines starting to bloom throughout the gardens and Franklin Park.

  • Peonies that are close to blooming. The buds should turn into lovely, layered flowers in near future.


Many favorites from past weeks are still in bloom, too:

  • Lilacs throughout the gardens and park are perfuming the air. 

  • White and pink flowering dogwoods showing off their spring color.

  • The delightful blue flowers of variegated Jacob's ladder can be seen in the Rainbow Welcome Terrace in the Children's Garden and in the Pollinators Garden.

  • Variegated Solomon's seal has arching stems with bell-like flowers hanging below. These plants are also in the Children’s Garden and Community Garden Campus.

  • The blue flowers of mazus, a groundcover found on the steps of the Brides Garden and along the stone pathway of the Kid's Only Entrance to the Children's Garden.

  • Trumpet pitchers in the North Courtyard Bog Garden with funky blooms.

  • Deutzia showing off tiny white flowers

  • Alliums marked by purple or white pompom flowers that are spread throughout the park and gardens.

Umbrella Magnolia
Viburnum
Iris
Wood Hyacinth
Abelias
Mayapple
Striped Maple
Buckeye
Columbine
Peony Buds
Lilac
Flowering Dogwood
Variegated Jacob's Ladder
Variegated Solomon's Seal
Mazus
Trumpet Pitcher
Deutzia
Allium

Plan A Visit

Previous Reports

May 5 Report

Welcome to May! The blooms continue this month, and many new ones are just starting. Be sure to plan a visit if you haven’t or come back and see something new!

  • Oak trees in the gardens and park are in full bloom. The tassel-like flowers are called catkins.
  • Lining the entrance drive are the yellow/chartreuse flowers of the cucumber magnolias.
  • Variegated Jacob’s ladder, with its delightful blue flowers, can be seen in the Rainbow Welcome Terrace of the Scotts Miracle-Gro Foundation Children’s Garden and in the Scotts Miracle-Gro Company Community Garden Campus Pollinator Garden.
  • Mazus, a petite yet vigorous ground cover, is in full flower glory! The blue flowers are found on the steps of the Brides Garden and along the stone pathway of the Kid’s Only Entrance to the Children’s Garden.
  • The spotted cranesbill is blooming near the pawpaws in the My Ohio Woods area of the Children’s Garden.
  • Crested irises are also in bloom in the Children’s Garden along the path around the creek.
  • Alliums are starting to bloom, marked by purple or white pompom flowers. There are many varieties in the Children’s Garden, Grand Mallway, Crane Conifer Garden & Ornamental Grass Collection and Community Garden Campus.
  • Variegated Solomon’s seal has arching stems with bell-like flowers hanging below. These plants are growing in the Children’s Garden and Community Garden Campus.
  • Stop by the bog in the North Courtyard to see the trumpet pitchers blooming and in bud. 
  • While you’re in the North Courtyard, look for deutzia starting to show off tiny white flowers. These flowers can also be seen in the Brides Garden and Community Garden Campus.
  • Lilacs are starting to flower and will soon be perfuming the air. See and smell them in the Children’s Garden, Community Garden Campus, West Terrace and throughout Franklin Park.
  • Umbrella magnolias, Ohio buckeyes and tulip trees have fat flower buds. Stay tuned for details next week!

Many favorites from past weeks are still in bloom, too:

  • The last of the late daffodils are still blooming; look around in the Children’s Garden for these.
  • White and pink flowering dogwoods are showing off their spring color.
  • Fothergilla has delightful white bottlebrush flowers.
  • Large and colorful pansies were planted in many garden beds and containers.
  • Giant snowflakes with their bell-shaped flowers and yellow celandine poppies flank the entrance to the Children’s Garden.
  • The Japanese kerria, with yellow flowers, are still flowering strong near the Learning Pavilion in the Children’s Garden and Community Garden Campus.
  • The white flowers of the pearlbush (Exochorda) are blooming in the Children’s Garden, near the sandbox. 
  • Sassafras, a native tree, is covered in tiny yellow flowers in the Children’s Garden.
  • The cute and tiny blue flowers of Siberian bugloss in the Children’s Garden.
April 28 Report

If you haven’t visited yet this spring, we’d love to host you! There’s so much to see and smell in the gardens right now. The past weekend’s heat, though enjoyable, did not thrill the spring blooms. In very warm temperatures, blooms (bulbs in particular) will go fast. 

  • The tulips are a delight and it’s better to experience them sooner rather than later.
  • The white flowers of the pearlbush (Exochorda) are blooming in the Scotts Miracle-Gro Foundation Children’s Garden, near the sandbox. 
  • Bishop’s hat (Epimedium) flowers are quite distinctive. Find them near the Let’s Garden area of the Children’s Garden.
  • Sassafras, a native tree, is covered in tiny yellow flowers in the Children’s Garden.
  • Flowering dogwoods, another native, are showing off their spring color. 
  • One more native, fothergilla, has delightful white bottlebrush flowers.
  • The river birch (Betula nigra), near the main entrance and in the island north of the Brides Garden, has catkins which are 3-inch long male pendant flowers with upright female flowers.

Many favorites from past weeks are still in bloom, too:

  • Redbuds and their pink-purple and white flowers can be spotted throughout the Conservatory gardens and Franklin Park.
  • Large and colorful pansies in many garden beds and containers.
  • Giant snowflakes with their bell-shaped flowers and yellow celandine poppies flank the entrance to the Children’s Garden.
  • The Japanese kerria, also with yellow flowers, near the Learning Pavilion in the Children’s Garden and in the Community Garden Campus.
  • Bundles of Virginia bluebells in the Children’s Garden.
  • The cute and tiny blue flowers of Siberian bugloss in the Children’s Garden.
  • Grape hyacinths are blooming in the Brides Garden, Community Garden Campus, and Children’s Garden.
  • Korean viburnums smell lovely. They grow along the botanical garden pathway and at the Wells Barn.
  • The distinct Guinea hen flowers (Fritillaria meleagris) are blooming in the Scotts Miracle-Gro Company Community Garden Campus by the ornamental arbor.
April 21 Report

There’s so much to see in the gardens, not to mention the wonderful fragrances. Between the blooms and the sunshine (which we hope will stay with us for a few days this time around), it really feels like springtime!

  • Tulips are showing some fantastic color. There are many varieties throughout the gardens that are in bloom and more that will bloom in the coming days.
  • To the right of the Sunshine Celebration Arch in the Scotts Miracle-Gro Foundation Children’s Garden are the bell-shaped flowers of giant snowflakes (Leucojum).
  • Pigsqueaks have lovely pink flowers and are also located in the Children’s Garden. They’re named for the sound the leaves make when rubbed.
  • One other bloom in the Children’s Garden: Siberian bugloss (Brunnera). Commonly called false forget-me-nots, they’re showing off their tiny blue flowers.
  • Redbuds can be spotted throughout the Conservatory gardens and Franklin Park. Their pink-purple and white flowers grow directly on the trunk and branches of the trees. This phenomenon is called cauliflory.
  • Korean viburnums are popular because of their lovely aroma. See and smell them at the Wells Barn and along the botanical garden pathway.
  • Quince is still blooming. There’s a gorgeous specimen with orange-pink flowers in the Watersmart Garden across from the Crane Conifer Garden & Ornamental Grass Collection.
  • Guinea hen flowers (Fritillaria meleagris) are distinct looking. Several are blooming in the Scotts Miracle-Gro Company Community Garden Campus by the ornamental arbor.
  • Grape hyacinth, with a white to purple gradient, are blooming Community Garden Campus and Children’s Garden.

Favorites from past weeks are still in bloom, too:

  • Pansies have been planted, and this year’s varieties have some of the largest flowers ever!
  • Serviceberry bushes throughout the gardens have continued to bloom since last week.
  • Celandine poppies by the entrance to the Children’s Garden are showing off some wonderful yellow flowers. These are also native plants.
  • Japanese kerria in the Children’s Garden (and Community Garden Campus) also has bright yellow flowers.
  • Virginia bluebell is a native plant with bundles of blue flowers. They’re blooming in the Children’s Garden by the Fairy Garden near the waterfall.
  • Magnolia trees are still showing a lot of flower color.
April 14 Report

Many plants are starting to bloom! More sun is in the forecast, so come enjoy these beauties on a lovely spring day:

  • Pansies have been planted in some of the gardens and many container displays. This year’s varieties have some of the largest flowers ever! Pansies also make up most of this Rainbow bed in the Scotts Miracle-Gro Foundation Children’s Garden.
  • Celandine poppies are the wonderful yellow flowers in the Sneak Peak Forecourt of the Children’s Garden.
  • Guests will also find Virginia bluebells in the Children’s Garden by the Fairy Garden.
  • Find the white inflorescence of red elderberries to the right of the Learning Pavilion at the back of the Children’s Garden.
  • Japanese kerria is another berry found in the Children’s Garden (as well as the Grand Mallway and Scotts Miracle-Gro Company Community Garden Campus). It features bright yellow flowers.
  • Serviceberry is blooming with white flowers and can also be found in the Children’s Garden, Grand Mallway and Community Garden Campus.
  • Only found in the Community Garden Campus, Alba fiveleaf akebia with fragrant, creamy white flowers growing along the grape arbor.
  • Tulips are a highlight of Columbus Blooms, and they are starting to bloom. More beauty to come in the next week or so.

The upside to the cool spring weather is that it extends how long blooms last and spreads blooms across the season. These species from past reports are still in bloom: 

  • Late-blooming daffodils on the pathway between the main building and the Community Garden Campus are a must-see!
  • Hyacinths are still blooming in the Community Garden Campus and Children’s Garden. These are fragrant and a must-smell!
  • Many of the magnolia trees that persevered through the cold are showing a lot of flower color.
  • Spicebush has little yellow flowers.
  • Ornamental cherry trees are still flowering but are starting to fade. 

 

April 7 Report

It may not be as warm as many of us would like, but the colder weather has a definite upside. The cool spring temperatures keep the flowers of the daffodils, hellebores and forsythias particularly happy, resulting in longer-lasting spring beauty.

  • Cherry trees are popular and deservingly so—Franklin Park’s are showing some pink and white petals. The best time to see them is now, through this weekend and early next week. Cherry trees are found along the lower lakes and in the Japanese Garden. There’s also one in the Conservatory’s Bonsai Courtyard.
  • Quince is a shrub with various flower colors. Spot white flowering quince in the Scotts Miracle-Gro Community Garden Campus near the Wells Barn. 
  • Scilla brings pops of blue to the Community Garden Campus and island gardens off Broad Street.
  • Some of the Korean Viburnum—along the building past the Botanical Garden Welcome Patio—are starting to set flower buds.
  • As mentioned, the daffodils are still flowering strong. Look for daffodils on the path to the Community Garden Campus and out in the Grand Mallway.
  • Hyacinths are quite fragrant now! They’re located in the Scotts Miracle-Gro Foundation Children’s Garden, Grand Mallway, and Community Garden Campus. 
  • Spicebush still has tiny yellow flowers in the Children’s Garden.
  • Magnolias that weren’t hit by the recent cold are either flowering or their flower buds are opening. Different species are found around the Conservatory gardens and Franklin Park.
  • Some early tulips are starting to show some flower buds, but the best is yet to come. Stay tuned!
March 31 Report

The weather in Central Ohio may have seemed more wintry than springlike, but sometimes that’s part of the journey for spring blooms. The cold temperatures have stalled many of the buds on trees. Here’s the status of some of the blooming trees:

  • Many of the magnolias got hit with the cold, but there still will be a few flowers.
  • Cherry tree buds are progressing into their later stages but were slowed by the cold.
  • Redbud trees, dogwoods and the northern spicebush buds are starting to swell and show a hint of color. 
  • Many of the crab apples have broken buds. The leaves are quite small, but they are there.

Fortunately, there are still plenty of other flowers to enjoy during your visit, especially in the Scotts Miracle-Gro Company Community Garden Campus. Keep an eye out for these species:

  • Daffodils are still flowering and will continue to flower in several spots through the gardens and park. Good spots to see them are Grand Mallway, Community Garden Campus and the Japanese Garden on the northern side of Franklin Park. 
  • The Grecian windflowers are very cute and starting to bloom in the Community Garden Campus.
  • Blue Scilla creates a lovely blue carpet in the Rose Pavillion beds of the Community Garden Campus.
  • Fragrant hyacinths are starting to bloom in the Scotts Miracle-Gro Foundation Children’s Garden as well as the Community Garden Campus.
  • The Hellebores located by the South Tour Entrance, Botanical Garden Welcome Patio and Community Garden Campus are still blooming their hearts out. 
  • Forsythia is starting to fade but still in flower. Perhaps its job is done now that there have been several late snowfalls.
March 23 Report

The equinox passed, and it’s now officially spring! Warm weather paved the way for more blooms, and daylight savings means there’s more daylight to enjoy them. Looks for these seasonal stars this week:

  • Iris greet guests from the lawn by the Broad Street entrance.
  • The star magnolias in the North Courtyard and across from the Scotts Miracle-Gro Foundation Children’s Garden are starting to blossom.
  • A different tree to look out for is the Cornelian Cherry dogwood with yellow flowers. There are specimens located in the Scott Miracle-Gro Company Community Garden Campus.
  • Forsythia also sports bright yellow blooms in the Japanese Garden of Franklin Park and the Children’s Garden. A tale is told that three more snows occur after forsythia blooms.
  • Chionodoxa are small blue-violet flowers also found in the Children’s Garden.
  • It’s hard to miss the daffodils and red maples, both of which are flowering throughout the park and botanical gardens.
  • Iris reticulata, striped squill, hellebores, and crocus featured in last week’s Report still look lovely.
March 17 Report

It may not officially be spring yet, but signs of spring have certainly arrived! Early bloomers offer a sneak peek of the beauty of the season to come—primarily in or near the Scotts Miracle-Gro Foundation Children’s Garden and Scotts Miracle-Gro Company Community Garden Campus.

  • Snowdrops are small white flowers. They lived up to their name and pushed through the snow in the North Courtyard and outside the Children’s Garden.
  • Crocuses are also small flowers of a few colors. Spot them near the Learning Pavilion.
  • Witch Hazel sports a variety of colors on their streamer-like blooms. Find several shrubs on the botanical garden pathway across from the entrance to the Children’s Garden.
  • Winter Aconite is another flower found near the entrance to the Children’s Garden as well as the Crane Conifer Garden and Ornamental Grass Collection.
  • Striped squill and Iris reticulata are purple and white blooms that look wonderful in the Scotts Miracle-Gro Company Community Garden Campus.
  • Hellebores are found all around. A particular species, the lenten rose, is named for blooming around the time of Lent.

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